White America’s Long History of Rioting, Looting, & Burning Down Structures in The Name of Protesting

Brother Saye @sayetaryor

With the current uprise against White supremacy in America, many White supremacist sympathizers find themselves complaining about looting and burning of buildings and claim this behavior is un-American. When we study history, we see that looting and burning structure in the name of protest is very American. Whites have an extended history of destructive protest in America, starting with the Whiskey Rebellion of 1791, all the way to modern times. Let’s not even discuss how America was founded in the first place. As expected, White supremacists and their sympathizers are pushing the narrative that rioting, looting, and burning of structures is all of a sudden just “un-American behavior” exhibited by the “violent Black race.” Below are several examples of the claims being made.

One must wonder if these people would have sided with the farmers or the Founding Fathers during the Whiskey Rebellion. To be blunt, White supremacists and their sympathizers have no business lecturing to Blacks about protesting and how it should be conducted, when their entire history in America has shown them often resorting to rioting, burning, looting, and even killing. The most peaceful demonstration in America “on a large scale” was conducted by Blacks, so who are they to lecture us about protesting when we can show a long history of their traditionally destructive behavior. The nerve of these hypocrites.

White America’s Long History of Rioting, Looting, & Burning Down Structures & even Killing

1788 – Doctors Mob Riot, New York City

1791–1794 – Whiskey Rebellion, Western Pennsylvania (anti-excise tax on whiskey)

1799 – Fries Rebellion, 1799–1800, Tax revolt by Pennsylvania Dutch farmers Pennsylvania

1824 – Hard Scrabble and Snow Town Riots, 1824 & 1831 respectively, Providence, RI

1829 – Cincinnati riots of 1829, August 15–22, Cincinnati, Ohio

1834 – Anti-abolitionist riot, New York City

1834 – Attack on Canterbury Female Boarding School, Canterbury, Connecticut

1835 – Baltimore bank riot, August 6–9

1835 – Gentleman’s Riot, numerous riots throughout 1835 targeting abolitionists,[2] Boston, Massachusetts

1835 – Snow Riot, Washington D.C.

1835 – Destruction of Noyes Academy, Canaan, New Hampshire

1835–1836 – Toledo War, a boundary dispute between states of Michigan and Ohio

1836 – Cincinnati Riots of 1836, Cincinnati, Ohio

1837 – Flour Riots, New York City

1837 – Murder of Elijah Lovejoy

1838 – Burning of Pennsylvania Hall

1839 – Honey War, Iowa-Missouri border

1839 – Anti-Rent War, Hudson Valley, New York

1841 – Dorr Rebellion, Rhode Island

1841 – Cincinnati Riots of 1841, early September, Cincinnati, Ohio

1842 – Lombard Street Riot, (a.k.a. the Abolition Riots), August 1, Philadelphia

1842 – Muncy Abolition riot of 1842

1844 – Philadelphia Nativist Riots, May 6–8, July 6–7, Philadelphia (anti-Catholic)

1849 – Astor Place riot, May 10, New York City, (anti-British)

1851 – Christiana Riot, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania

1853 – Cincinnati Riot of 1853, Cincinnati, Ohio

1855 – Cincinnati riots of 1855

1855 – Lager Beer Riot, April 21, Chicago, Illinois

1855 – Portland Rum Riot, June 2, Portland, Maine

1855 – Bloody Monday, Know-Nothing Party riot, August 6, Louisville, Kentucky (anti-immigration)

1855 – Detroit brothel riots, 1855–1859, Detroit, Michigan [3]

1856 – Sacking of Lawrence, Kansas, May 21, 1856, when proslavery settlers, led by Douglas County Sheriff Samuel J. Jones, attacked and ransacked Lawrence, Kansas, founded by antislavery settlers from Massachusetts hoping to make Kansas a free state. The incident fueled the irregular conflict in Kansas Territory that later became known as Bleeding Kansas.

1856 – Pottawatomie massacre, May 24, Franklin County, Kansas

1856 – Know-Nothing Riot of 1856, Baltimore, Maryland

1856 – San Francisco Vigilance Movement, San Francisco, California

1857 – Know-Nothing Riot, June 1, Washington D.C. (anti-immigration)

1857 – New York City Police Riot, June 16, New York City

1857 – Dead Rabbits Riot, July 4–5, New York City

1858 – Know-Nothing Riot 1858, New Orleans, Louisiana

1859 – John Brown’s raid on Harpers Ferry, October 16, Harpers Ferry, Virginia

1870 – First New York City Orange riot

1870 – Kirk-Holden war, July–November, Caswell and Alamance counties North Carolina

1870 – Mamaroneck Riot, labor riot between Italian and Irish laborers

1871 – Second New York City Orange riot

1871 – Meridian race riot of 1871, March, Meridian, Mississippi

1871 – Los Angeles anti-Chinese riot, Los Angeles, California

1873 – Colfax massacre, April 13, Colfax, Louisiana

1874 – Election Riot of 1874, Barbour County, Alabama

1874 – Tompkins Square Riot, New York City

1874 – Battle of Liberty Place, New Orléans, Louisiana

1876 – South Carolina civil disturbances of 1876, South Carolina

1877 – Widespread rioting occurred across the US as part of the Great Railroad Strike of 1877:

Pittsburgh Railway Riots, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Reading Railroad massacre, Reading, Pennsylvania

Shamokin uprising, Shamokin, Pennsylvania

1877 – San Francisco Riot of 1877

1880 – 1880 Garret Mountain May Day riot, May 1, Paterson, New Jersey

1882 – Greenwood, New York, insurrection of 1882

1884 – Cincinnati riots of 1884, March 28–30, Cincinnati, Ohio

1885 – Rock Springs massacre, September 2, 1885, riot between Chinese miners and white miners; 28 killed, 15 injured, Rock Springs, Wyoming

1886 – Seattle riot of 1886, February 6–9, Seattle, Washington

1886 – Haymarket riot, May 4, Chicago, Illinois

1886 – Bay View Massacre, May 4; 1400 workers march for eight hour work day; 7 killed and several more wounded after confrontation with National Guard. Milwaukee, Wisconsin

1887 – Thibodaux Massacre, November 22–25; a racial attack mounted by white paramilitary groups in Thibodaux, Louisiana in November 1887 Thibodaux, Louisiana

1888 – Jaybird-Woodpecker War, 1888–90, violent post-Reconstruction political conflict in Texas. Fort Bend County, Texas

1891 – Hennessy Affair, New Orleans, Louisiana

1892–1893 – Mitcham War, Clarke County, Alabama

1894 – May Day riots of 1894, May 1, Cleveland, Ohio

1895 – New Orleans dockworkers riot, New Orleans, Louisiana

1897 – Lattimer massacre, September 1897, near Hazleton, Pennsylvania

1898 – Battle of Virden, October 12, Coal strike; 11 killed, 35 wounded, Virden, Illinois

1898 – Phoenix election riot, November 8, Greenwood County, South Carolina

1898 – Wilmington insurrection, November 10, Wilmington, North Carolina

1899 – Pana riot, April 10, Coal mine labor conflict; 7 killed, 6 wounded, Pana, Illinois

1899 – Coeur d’Alene, Idaho labor confrontation of 1899

1900 – Akron Riot of 1900, Akron, Ohio

1900 – New Orleans Riot

1901 – Denver Riots, Denver, Colorado[citation needed]

1901 – New York Race Riots[citation needed]

1901 – Pierce City Riots, Pierce City, Missouri

1902 – Liverpool Riots, Denver, Colorado

1903 – Colorado Labor Wars, 1903–1904

1903 – Anthracite Coal Strike, Eastern Pennsylvania

1903 – Evansville Race Riot, Evansville, Indiana

1903 – Motormen’s Riot, Richmond, Virginia

1905 – 1905 Chicago teamsters’ strike, April 7 – July 19, Conflict between the Teamsters Union and the Employers’ Association of Chicago by the end, 21 people killed and 416 injured, mostly workers. Chicago, IL

1906 – Rioting and looting after the 1906 San Francisco earthquake

1906 – Atlanta Riots, Atlanta, Georgia

1907 – Bellingham riots, Bellingham, Washington

1908 – Springfield Race Riot, Springfield, Illinois

1909 – Greek Town riot, February 21, South Omaha, Nebraska

1910 – Johnson–Jeffries riots

1910–1919 – Bandit War Southern Texas

1912 – Lawrence textile strike, Lawrence, Massachusetts (January to March)

1912 – Grabow riot (July 7)

1913 – Wheatland Riot, August 3, Wheatland, California

1913 – Colorado Coalfield War, September 23 – April 29, 1914, Southern Colorado

1913 – Indianapolis streetcar strike of 1913, October 30 – November 7, Indianapolis, Indiana

1914 – Ludlow massacre, April 20, Ludlow, Colorado

1916 – Preparedness Day bombing, July 22, San Francisco, California

1916 – Everett massacre, November 5, Everett, Washington

1917 – East St. Louis Race Riots, July 2, St. Louis, Missouri & East St. Louis, Illinois

1917 – Chester race riot, July 25–29, Chester, Pennsylvania

1917 – Springfield Vigilante Riot, Springfield, Missouri

1917 – Green Corn Rebellion, August 3, A brief popular uprising advocating for the rural poor and against military conscription, Central Oklahoma

1917 – Houston Race riot, August 23, Houston, Texas

1917 – St. Paul Streetcar Riots, October and December, St. Paul, Minnesota

1918 – Detroit trolley riot, Detroit, Michigan [3]

1919 – May Day Riots, May 1, Cleveland, Ohio, Boston, Massachusetts, New York City, New York (state)

1919 – Red Summer, white riots against blacks

Blakeley, Georgia (February 8)

Memphis, Tennessee (March 14)

Morgan County, West Virginia (April 10)

Jenkins County, Georgia (April 13)

Charleston, South Carolina (May 10)

Sylvester, Georgia (May 10)

New London, Connecticut (May 29)

Putnam County, Georgia (May 27–29)

Monticello, Mississippi (May 31)

Memphis, Tennessee (June 13)

New London, Connecticut (June 13)

Annapolis, Maryland (June 27)

Macon, Mississippi (June 27)

Bisbee, Arizona (July 3)

Dublin, Georgia (July 6)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (July 7)

Coatesville, Pennsylvania (July 8)

Tuscaloosa, Alabama (July 9)

Longview, Texas (July 10–12)

Indianapolis, Indiana (July 14)

Port Arthur, Texas (July 15)

Washington, D.C. (July 19–24)

Norfolk, Virginia (July 21)

New Orleans, Louisiana (July 23)

Darby, Pennsylvania (July 23)

Hobson City, Alabama (July 26)

Chicago, Illinois (July 27 – August 3)

Newberry, South Carolina (July 28)

Bloomington, Illinois (July 31)

Syracuse, New York (July 31)

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (July 31)

Hattiesburg, Mississippi (August 4)

Texarkana, Texas riot of 1919 (August 6)

New York, New York (August 21)

Knoxville, Tennessee (August 30)

Ellenton, South Carolina (September 15–21)

Omaha, Nebraska (September 28–29)

Elaine, Arkansas (October 1–2)

Baltimore, Maryland (October 1–2)

Corbin, Kentucky (October 31, 1919)

Wilmington, Delaware (November 13)

1919 – Annapolis riot of 1919, June 27, Annapolis, Maryland

1919 – Centralia Massacre, November 11, Centralia, Washington

1920 – Battle of Matewan, May 20, Matewan, West Virginia

1920 – Ocoee massacre, November 2–3, Ocoee, Florida

1921 – Tulsa Race Massacre, May 31 – June 1, Tulsa, Oklahoma

1921 – Battle of Blair Mountain, August–September, Logan County, West Virginia

1922 – Herrin Massacre, June 21–22, Herrin, Illinois

1922 – Straw Hat Riot, September 13–15, New York City, New York

1922 – Perry race riot, December 14–15, Perry, Florida

1923 – Rosewood Massacre, January 1–7, Rosewood, Florida

1925 – Ossian Sweet incident, September, Detroit, Michigan

1927 – Yakima Valley Anti-Filipino Riot, November 8–11, Yakima Valley

1927 – Columbine Mine Massacre, November 21, Serene, Colorado

1929 – Loray Mill strike, Gastonia, North Carolina

1930 – Watsonville Riots, January 19–23, Watsonville, California

1931 – Battle of Evarts, May 5, Harlan County, Kentucky

1931 – The Housing Protests, August 3, Chicago, Illinois

1931 – Hawaii Riot, Hawaii

1932 – Bonus Army March, Spring/Summer 1932, Washington, D.C.

1932 – Ford Hunger March, March 7, 3,000 unemployed workers march on Ford Motors, five are killed, River Rouge plant, Dearborn, Michigan

1934 – Minneapolis Teamsters Strike of 1934, Minneapolis, Minnesota

1934 – Auto-Lite strike, April 4 – June 3, the “Battle of Toledo” riot, Toledo, Ohio

1934 – 1934 West Coast Longshore Strike, May 9 – October 12, San Francisco Bay Area, California; Portland, Oregon; Seattle, Washington

1934 – Textile workers strike (1934)

1934 – Detroit World Series riot, October 10, Detroit, Michigan

1935 – Southern Tenant Farmers’ Union Riot, Arkansas

1935 – Terre Haute General Strike, July 22–23, A labor dispute between an enameling company and a labor union led to a two-day general strike. Indiana National Guard was called out and martial law was declared by the Governor. The city was under a state of martial law for six months. It was the third general strike in U.S. History. Terre Haute, Indiana

1937 – Flint Sit-Down Strike, General Motors’ Fisher Body Plant, Flint, Michigan

1937 – Battle of the Overpass, May 26, Dearborn, Michigan [3]

1937 – Republic Steel Strike, May 30, Chicago, Illinois

1939 – U.S. Nazi Riot, New York City

1943 – Beaumont race riot of 1943, June, Beaumont, Texas

1943 – Zoot Suit Riots, July 3, Los Angeles, California (anti-Hispanic and anti-zoot suit)

1946 – Columbia race riot of 1946, February 25–26, Columbia, Tennessee

1946 – Battle of Athens (1946), August, revolt by citizens against corrupt local government, McMinn County, Tennessee

1946 – Airport Homes race riots, Chicago, Illinois

1947 – Fernwood Park race riot, mid-August, Fernwood, Chicago, IL

1949 – Fairground Park riot, June 21, St. Louis Missouri

1949 – Anacostia Pool Riot, June 29, Anacostia, Washington, D.C.

1949 – Peekskill riots, Peekskill, New York

1949 – Englewood race riot, November 8–12, Englewood, Chicago, IL

1951 – Cicero race riot of 1951, July 12, Cicero, Illinois

1956 – Mansfield School Integration Incident 400 pro-segregationists brandishing weapons and racist signage prevent 12 black children from entering Mansfield High School Mansfield, TX

1958 – Battle of Hayes Pond, January 18, Maxton, North Carolina, Armed confrontation between members of the NC Lumbee tribe and the KKK.

1959 – Harriett-Henderson Cotton Mills Strike Henderson, North Carolina

1960 – El Cajon Boulevard Riot, August 20, San Diego, California

1960 – Ax Handle Saturday, August 27, Jacksonville, Florida

1962 – Ole Miss riot 1962, September 3 – October 1, The University of Mississippi, Oxford, Mississippi

1966 – Marquette Park housing march, August 5, Chicago, Illinois

1966 – Sunset Strip curfew riots, November 12, various other flareups, basis for the song “For What It’s Worth (Buffalo Springfield song)”, West Hollywood, California

1968 – Columbia University protests of 1968, April 23, New York City, New York

1968 – 1968 Democratic National Convention protests, including the police riots of August 27–28, Chicago, Illinois

1969 – Zip to Zap riot, May 9–11, Zap, North Dakota

1969 – People’s Park Riots, May, Berkeley, California

1969 – Days of Rage, October 8–11, Weathermen riot in Chicago, Illinois

1970 – Student strike of 1970, May 1970

1970 – Kent State riots/shootings, May 1970, four killed, Kent, Ohio

1970 – Hard Hat Riot, Wall Street, May 8, New York City

1970 – 1970 Memorial Park riot, August 24–27, Royal Oak, Michigan

1970 – Sterling Hall bombing, Univ. of Wisc., August 24, one killed, Madison, Wisconsin

1971 – Wilmington riot 1971, February 9, Wilmington, North Carolina

1971 – May Day protests 1971, May 3, Washington, D.C.

1974 – Boston busing race riots anti-busing riots throughout Boston, Massachusetts

1976 – Escambia High School riots, February 5, Pensacola, Florida

1976 – Anti-busing riot in downtown Boston, April 5, Boston, Massachusetts

1979 – Herman Hill riot, April 15, Wichita, Kansas

1979 – Levittown Gas Riot, June 23–24, Thousands rioted in response to increased gasoline prices in the U.S., 198 arrested, 44 police and 200 rioters injured. Gas stations were damaged and cars set on fire, Levittown, Pennsylvania

1979 – Greensboro massacre, November 3, Greensboro, North Carolina

1986 – Marquette Park KKK rally, June 28, Chicago, Illinois

1997 – North Hollywood shootout, February 1997, Los Angeles, California

1999 – Michigan State University student riot, April 1999, East Lansing, Michigan

1999 – Woodstock ’99 music festival incident, July 1999, Rome, New York

1999 – WTO Meeting of 1999, “The Battle in Seattle”, November 1999, Seattle, Washington

2000 – Brooks Brothers riot, Miami-Dade County, Florida

2001 – Seattle Mardi Gras riot, February 27, 2001, Seattle, Washington

2004 – 2004 American League Championship Series, October 21, 1 dead, Boston, Massachusetts

2006 – San Bernardino punk riot, March 4, San Bernardino, California

2009 – 2009 G-20 Pittsburgh summit protests, September 24–25, 193 arrested

2010 – Springfest riot, April 10, 200 police disperse crowd of 8,000 using tear gas, pepper spray, rubber bullets, and bean bag rounds, near the campus of James Madison University; dozens injured. 30–35 arrested; Harrisonburg, Virginia.

2010 – Santa Cruz May Day riot, May 1, 250 rampage through downtown Santa Cruz attacking 18 businesses, causing an estimated $100,000 in damages. 1 arrested. Santa Cruz, California.

2011 – Occupy Wall Street (Brooklyn Bridge protests). Demonstrators blocked the bridge and more than 700 people were arrested. New York, New York

2011 – Occupy Oakland Oakland protests riots. October. Protesters shattered windows, set fires, and plastered buildings with graffiti. Riot police fired heavy amounts of tear gas on the protesters.

2012 – Kentucky Wildcats supporters in Lexington, Kentucky

2012 – NATO 2012 Chicago Summit, May. Conflict between riot police and protesters. Dozens of demonstrators clubbed and arrested.

2014 – Bundy Standoff, April 5–May, an armed confrontation between supporters of cattle rancher Cliven Bundy and law enforcement following a 21-year legal dispute in which the United States Bureau of Land Management (BLM) obtained court orders directing Bundy to pay over $1 million in withheld grazing fees for Bundy’s use of federally-owned land adjacent to Bundy’s ranch in southeastern Nevada.

2016 – Occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, January–February 2016. 1 killed and several dozen arrested at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, Oregon.

2016 – 2016 Sacramento riot, June 26, A confrontation between white nationalists and left-wing counter protesters at the California State Capitol. Ten people were hospitalized for stabbing and laceration wounds.

2017 – 2017 Unite the Right rally, Charlottesville, Virginia, August 11–12. At a Unite the Right rally of white nationalists and white supremacists opposing the removal of a statue of Robert E. Lee, rally attendees and counter-protesters clashed, sometimes violently. A woman, Heather Heyer, was killed and 19 other injured when a rally attendee drove his car into a crowd of counter-protestors. Two law enforcement officers also died in a helicopter crash while monitoring the event.

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